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Latest News

  • The Friday Five - May 29th, 2015

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, May 29, 2015

    Each day, the DLCC’s experts comb through statehouse political news across the country to stay on top of the latest developments. Here are five stories that may have flown under your radar this week.

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  • MSNBC: "Texas keeping thousands from registering"

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, May 29, 2015

    Thousands of eligible voters are being "systematically" disenfranchised by Texas' officials failure to transmit valid voter registrations, according to new reporting by MSNBC:

    Thousands of Texans are being disenfranchised thanks to chronic failures in the state’s voter registration system, a Democratic group alleges based on government records and extensive additional evidence...

    The letter, which was obtained exclusively by msnbc, is likely to precede a lawsuit under the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA), more commonly known as the Motor Voter law, which requires states to offer registration opportunities through their motor vehicle departments and other government agencies...

    The allegations offer the latest evidence that Texas’s Republican administration is creating obstacles to voting as the state’s soaring Hispanic population threatens to shift the balance of power in the state. Around 2 million Texas Hispanics are unregistered, and just 39% of eligible Hispanics in the state voted in 2012, compared to 61% of eligible whites and 63% of eligible blacks.

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  • The Friday Five - May 22nd, 2015

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, May 22, 2015

    Each day, the DLCC’s experts comb through statehouse political news across the country to stay on top of the latest developments. Here are five stories that may have flown under your radar this week.

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  • Armed Forces Day Special: 30 current and former military members serving as legislators

    By Nathan Thomas on Saturday, May 16, 2015

    In honor of Armed Forces Day on May 16, we want to recognize some of the amazing Democratic legislators from around the country who have served or are serving in our nation’s military.

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  • The Friday Five - May 15th, 2015

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, May 15, 2015

    Each day, the DLCC’s experts comb through statehouse political news across the country to stay on top of the latest developments. Here are five stories that may have flown under your radar this week.

    Print
  • MSNBC: "Texas keeping thousands from registering"

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, May 29, 2015

    Thousands of eligible voters are being "systematically" disenfranchised by Texas' officials failure to transmit valid voter registrations, according to new reporting by MSNBC:

    Thousands of Texans are being disenfranchised thanks to chronic failures in the state’s voter registration system, a Democratic group alleges based on government records and extensive additional evidence...

    The letter, which was obtained exclusively by msnbc, is likely to precede a lawsuit under the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA), more commonly known as the Motor Voter law, which requires states to offer registration opportunities through their motor vehicle departments and other government agencies...

    The allegations offer the latest evidence that Texas’s Republican administration is creating obstacles to voting as the state’s soaring Hispanic population threatens to shift the balance of power in the state. Around 2 million Texas Hispanics are unregistered, and just 39% of eligible Hispanics in the state voted in 2012, compared to 61% of eligible whites and 63% of eligible blacks.

    Print
  • Could a poorly-timed press release flip the New York Senate?

    By Nathan Thomas on Wednesday, May 13, 2015

    It took former New York Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos an entire week to realize what every other New Yorker must have known the moment he was indicted on corruption charges on May 4th:  Skelos' leadership of the New York Senate was over.

    But in those seven days, Skelos put up a major fight to keep his job and convinced fifteen Republican colleagues to sign a late-night media release insisting in the strongest possible terms that Skelos "should remain" in charge of the state Senate. Thanks to the team at Daily Kos Elections, it's possible to list those fifteen corruption-loving Republicans in approximate order of how blue their districts were in the last presidential election:

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  • Gun Safety Opponents React to Common-Sense Background Check Bill With Recalls

    By Carolyn Fiddler on Thursday, April 16, 2015

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

    CONTACT:  Carolyn Fiddler, National Communications Director, DLCC
                    fiddler@dlcc.org

    Gun Safety Opponents React to Common-Sense Background Check Bill With Recalls
    Oregon Democrats Vote to Enhance Gun Safety; Right-Wing Activists Retaliate

    WASHINGTON, D.C. –– Today Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee Executive Director Michael Sargeant congratulated Oregon Democrats for voting to close a loophole in the state’s background check law, and he blasted anti-gun safety activists for filing a recall petition against several of the bill’s sponsors, including House Majority Leader Val Hoyle.

    “While Majority Leader Val Hoyle and her fellow Democrats are standing up to anti-gun safety special interests by advocating background checks on private gun sales, right-wing activists have been plotting revenge. This recall petition is naked retaliation by anti-gun safety activists who object to common-sense firearms laws.

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  • B for Bigotry

    By Michael Sargeant on Wednesday, April 1, 2015

    Even as national outrage over Indiana’s new right-to-discriminate law continues to escalate, yet another GOP-controlled statehouse has passed a so-called “religious freedom restoration act.” Meanwhile, a red-faced Indiana legislature scrambles to “clarify” its shameful new law.

    Despite some Arkansas lawmakers’ best efforts to include specific anti-discrimination language to House Bill 1228, the state legislature gave final approval to the measure. The bill’s Republican sponsor refused the change, despite his earlier insistence that the legislation was not meant to allow discrimination.

    The Arkansas right-to-discriminate bill is substantively the same as Indiana’s despicable new law. The broad language in both measures potentially grants businesses and private citizens license to discriminate against gays and lesbians by using religious prejudices as a shield.

     Now that they’ve been thoroughly embarrassed by the outrage – both national and local – over the law, Indiana legislators will seek to “clarify” it before their session ends at the end of the month. They should spend their remaining weeks of session repealing the measure instead of attempting to tweak something so fundamentally and deeply flawed.

    Will Arkansas similarly seek to retcon their new right-to-discriminate law after the backlash spreads southward?

    And which state will pass the next one?

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  • GOP Senator: “No reason” to protect women from doctors like me

    By Carolyn Fiddler on Monday, March 30, 2015

    Seventeen years ago, future Alabama state Senator Larry Stutts was new mother Rose Church’s OB/GYN.  Rose was discharged from the hospital just 36 hours after giving birth. She returned about 36 hours later with complications and was treated and released. In another 36 hours, Rose was dead. 

    Less than a year later, “Rose’s Law” passed both the state House and Senate unanimously. The measure gives women a legal right to remain in a hospital for 48 hours after a normal vaginal delivery or for 96 hours after a cesarean section. Dr. Stutts was a named defendant in the wrongful death suit filed by Rose’s grieving husband.  (The case was settled out of court.)

    Fast forward to November 2014: Dr. Larry Stutts was elected to the Alabama state Senate as a Republican.

    Just a couple of months into his first term, Sen. Stutts is trying to repeal the law spurred by his own patient’s tragic demise. 

    Senator Dr. Larry Stutts (R-Sheffield) has offered SB289, which would repeal a woman’s legal right to remain in the hospital for 48 hours after a normal live birth and 96 hours if the birth was cesarean or presented complication. …

    Stutts took to Facebook to defend this measure saying, “I am proud to say that I am hard at work removing one-size-fits-all Obamacare-style laws from the books in Alabama.”

    Sen. Stutts may hope that invoking the “Obamacare” bogeyman will distract his colleagues and constituents from the real impetus for Rose’s Law. (Never mind that Rose’s Law predates Obamacare by over a decade.)

    Today, Stutts says he is joined by six “conservative colleagues,” to change the law.

    However, Stutts did not make his Senate colleagues aware of [Rose] Church's death while under his care or her relationship to the bill he is trying to eliminate.

    The “conservative colleagues” listed as co-sponsors of SB289 are all men, by the way. 

    Sen. Stutts also wants to repeal a law requiring doctors to notify patients if their mammograms show signs of dense tissue, which has been known to mask breast cancer. The notification measure was introduced by Democrat Roger Bedford, the senator (barely) unseated by Stutts last fall.

    Bedford introduced the bill after his wife was diagnosed with stage three breast cancer, after months earlier receiving a mammogram in which her cancer had been masked by dense tissue.

    Mrs. Bedford was not informed about the inefficiency of a mammogram to detect cancer in women whose breasts contain dense tissue; by the time her cancer was detected by other means, the disease had spread into her lymph nodes. 

    Sen. Stutts further claims his bill that specifically undermines women’s healthcare is really about eradicating mandates and “emotional legislation.”

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  • The Friday Five - May 29th, 2015

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, May 29, 2015

    Each day, the DLCC’s experts comb through statehouse political news across the country to stay on top of the latest developments. Here are five stories that may have flown under your radar this week.

    Print
  • The Friday Five - May 22nd, 2015

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, May 22, 2015

    Each day, the DLCC’s experts comb through statehouse political news across the country to stay on top of the latest developments. Here are five stories that may have flown under your radar this week.

    Print
  • The Friday Five - May 15th, 2015

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, May 15, 2015

    Each day, the DLCC’s experts comb through statehouse political news across the country to stay on top of the latest developments. Here are five stories that may have flown under your radar this week.

    Print
  • Could a poorly-timed press release flip the New York Senate?

    By Nathan Thomas on Wednesday, May 13, 2015

    It took former New York Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos an entire week to realize what every other New Yorker must have known the moment he was indicted on corruption charges on May 4th:  Skelos' leadership of the New York Senate was over.

    But in those seven days, Skelos put up a major fight to keep his job and convinced fifteen Republican colleagues to sign a late-night media release insisting in the strongest possible terms that Skelos "should remain" in charge of the state Senate. Thanks to the team at Daily Kos Elections, it's possible to list those fifteen corruption-loving Republicans in approximate order of how blue their districts were in the last presidential election:

    Print
  • DLCC National Political Director Kurt Fritts featured on Fox News' Power Play

    By Nathan Thomas on Tuesday, May 5, 2015

    On the May 4th, 2015 edition of Fox News' "Power Play," DLCC National Political Director Kurt Fritts sat down with host Chris Stirewalt to discuss Democratic strategy in 2016 legislative battlegrounds and our multi-cycle effort to defeat Republican gerrymandering by the 2020 Census:

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