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Latest News

  • The Friday Five - August 28th, 2015

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, August 28, 2015

    Each day, the DLCC’s experts comb through statehouse political news across the country to stay on top of the latest developments. Here are five stories that may have flown under your radar this week.

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  • The Friday Five - August 21st, 2015

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, August 21, 2015

    Each day, the DLCC’s experts comb through statehouse political news across the country to stay on top of the latest developments. Here are five stories that may have flown under your radar this week.

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  • Legislator Julian Bond: Remembering a Civil Rights Icon

    By Nathan Thomas on Tuesday, August 18, 2015

    This week, the nation mourns the passing of longtime civil rights leader Julian Bond, who died over the weekend at age 75 after a battle with vascular disease.

    But before he served as national Chairman of the NAACP or as founding President of the Southern Poverty Law Center, Julian Bond blazed a far different path that set the stage for many thousands of others to follow; Bond was one of the first African American state legislators elected in the era of the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act.

    It was an extraordinarily difficult path to travel.

    Before the 1960s, many states like Georgia assigned state legislative seats on a county-by-county basis, which often limited the political power of minority communities and led to significant under-representation of cities and over-representation of smaller, rural counties. When this practice was struck down by the Supreme Court in Reynolds v. Sims (1964), before the passage of the Voting Rights Act, a federal court ordered special elections for 141 Georgia House seats that had been redrawn to comply with the “one person, one vote” principle.

    Those elections were held on June 16th, 1965, and 25-year-old Julian Bond stepped forward as a candidate. He won – along with seven other new African American legislators.

    But then, the mostly-white Georgia House refused to let Representative-elect Bond take his seat. Three times.

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  • The Friday Five - August 14th, 2015

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, August 14, 2015

    Each day, the DLCC’s experts comb through statehouse political news across the country to stay on top of the latest developments. Here are five stories that may have flown under your radar this week.

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  • The Friday Five - August 7th, 2015

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, August 7, 2015

    Each day, the DLCC’s experts comb through statehouse political news across the country to stay on top of the latest developments. Here are five stories that may have flown under your radar this week.

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  • DLCC Applauds Supreme Court’s Ruling Upholding Marriage Equality

    By Carolyn Fiddler on Friday, June 26, 2015

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    CONTACT:  Carolyn Fiddler, National Communications Director
                    fiddler@dlcc.org 

    DLCC Applauds Supreme Court’s Ruling Upholding Marriage Equality
    Democratic State Lawmakers Paved the Way for Landmark Ruling

    WASHINGTON, D.C. –– Today Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee Executive Director Michael Sargeant applauded the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges. The majority opinion strikes down state laws that restrict marriage to opposite-sex couples.

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  • DLCC Applauds Supreme Court’s Ruling on Obamacare

    By Carolyn Fiddler on Thursday, June 25, 2015

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    CONTACT:  Carolyn Fiddler, National Communications Director
                    fiddler@dlcc.org 

    DLCC Applauds Supreme Court’s Ruling on Obamacare
    King v. Burwell Guarantees Millions of Americans Continued Access to Healthcare

    WASHINGTON, D.C. –– Today Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee Executive Director Michael Sargeant lauded the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision that ensures millions of Americans will continue to have access to the subsidies that have helped make Obamacare a success.

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  • Clementa Pinckney: A Legacy of Equality, Peace, and Compassion

    By Carolyn Fiddler on Friday, June 19, 2015

    In the wake of the horrific events in Charleston on Wednesday night, the thoughts and prayers of all of us here at the DLCC go out to the loved ones of Reverend and Sen. Clementa Pinckney and the other victims of this tragedy. 

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  • DLCC Board Member Larry Hall (NC) Featured on The Rachel Maddow Show

    By Nathan Thomas on Friday, June 12, 2015

    Last night, North Carolina House Democratic Leader Larry Hall, a member of the DLCC Board of Directors, joined Rachel Maddow to discuss the appalling passage of bills to restrict gay couples' adoption rights in Michigan and subject North Carolina couples to local officials' religious tests in order to get married:

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  • Ballot Battles: From the Statehouse to the White House

    By Carolyn Fiddler on Thursday, June 4, 2015

    Today Hillary Clinton is calling for 20 days of early voting in every state as part of a larger effort to draw attention to – and fight – discriminatory voting laws all across the country.

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  • Meet Georgia Democrats' newest rising star

    By Alexandra Weinroth on Monday, August 17, 2015

    In an August 11th special election for Georgia's 80th House District, 29-year old Democrat Taylor Bennett became Georgia Democrats’ newest ris

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  • Georgia: Democrat Taylor Bennett picks off GOP-held House Seat

    By Nathan Thomas on Wednesday, August 12, 2015

    In a race that the Atlanta Journal-Constitution said "should be a gimme putt for Republicans," the result was anything but. The Chamblee Post explains:

    Democrat Taylor Bennett has defeated Republican J Max Davis in the hotly contested House District 80 Special Election Runoff.

    Bennett, who was the top vote getter in the four candidate July 14th Special Election, carried that momentum into the two-person runoff. Bennett’s momentum, fueled by what he called “an incredible team effort” carried him through to once again receive the most votes and win the House District 80 State Representative Seat.

    This is the second consecutive week in which Democrats have won a previously-Republican legislative seat in back-to-back upset victories. On August 4th, Democrat Leanne Krueger-Braneky picked up Pennsylvania's 161st House District; attorney and former Georiga Tech quarterback Taylor Bennett has now picked up Georgia's 80th District. Both seats were heavily gerrymandered to favor Republicans, with Bennett's district favoring Republican Mitt Romney by more than 13 points in 2012.

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  • Hot in Cleveland: State and Presidential Politics Collide on the Debate Stage

    By Carolyn Fiddler on Thursday, August 6, 2015

    This is a momentous day in a momentous week in both state and national politics.

    All week long, hundreds of state lawmakers from across the country are convening in Seattle for the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) 2015 Legislative Summit. And tonight, a similarly daunting number of contenders for the Republican presidential nomination convene in Ohio for their first presidential debate.

    These events may seem unrelated, but they in fact share an important connection: many of the Republicans debating tonight served in their states’ legislatures before pursuing their political ambitions on a national scale.

    Before they began preparing to take the stage for tonight’s debate (or the JV forum beforehand), Scott Walker, Marco Rubio, John Kasich, Rick Perry, Lindsey Graham, Rick Santorum, and Bobby Jindal began their political careers in statehouses.

    The GOP-controlled legislatures in Wisconsin, Florida, Ohio, Texas, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Louisiana had busy sessions in 2015. The GOP presidential candidates’ former colleagues restricted choice, undermined ethics reforms, encouraged discrimination against same-sex couples, and played shell games with their states’ finances… just to name a few of this year’s legislative lowlights.

    In honor of the vastness of the GOP presidential field, here are the top 17 terrible things to come out of the former lawmakers’ home legislatures in 2015.

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  • Democrat Leanne Krueger-Braneky picks up Pennsylvania House seat from Republicans

    By Alexandra Weinroth on Wednesday, August 5, 2015

    Former Sustainable Business Network of Greater Philadelphia executive director Leanne Krueger-Braneky has won the August 4th special election for state representative in Pennsylvania’s 161st district, picking up a Republican-held district and putting Democrats one seat closer to the majority.

    Last April, Republican incumbent Rep. Joe Hackett retired. Hackett had previously defeated Krueger-Braneky by more than 2,000 votes in November 2014. But this time around, Krueger-Braneky won a three-way race with 47.68% of the vote, defeating GOP nominee Paul Mullen and write-in candidate Lisa Esler.

    Leanne ran on a platform of tax relief for the middle class, working to level the playing field for small business, making gas drillers pay their fair share, and reversing the billion-dollar education cuts previously made by former Republican Gov. Tom Corbett. And with Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf locked in a major budget standoff with Republican legislators, some speculate that Krueger-Braneky’s win significantly strengthens Gov. Wolf’s hand as he seeks to balance the budget while investing in public schools.

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  • Op-Ed by DLCC's Michael Sargeant, Advantage 2020's Mark Schauer published by The Hill

    By Michael Sargeant on Friday, July 10, 2015

    Reality of redistricting in a post-Arizona world

    By Michael Sargeant and Mark Schauer
    June 9th, 2015

    On June 29, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the will of the voters with its ruling in Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission. The Court’s ruling was not a resounding victory in the battle against GOP gerrymandering; rather, it simply confirms the rights of voters in states like Arizona and California to create nonpartisan commissions to conduct congressional redistricting. In most other states, redistricting authority remains in the hands of state legislatures, where Republican lawmakers have employed aggressive gerrymandering to distort Congress and further their partisan agenda.

    The Arizona ruling is a positive development for those who value meaningful democratic representation in Congress. But Democrats and our allies must not allow this decision to divert us from the most effective strategy to fight GOP gerrymandering: electing more Democratic lawmakers to draw the maps. While the establishment of redistricting commissions by voters will remain an available remedy in a few of the most egregiously gerrymandered states, the work of the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee (DLCC) and Advantage 2020 to elect more Democratic state legislators remains the most crucial weapon in the fight for fairer districts.

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